Assessing GDPR 30 Days In: A Report from the Field

Enforcement of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) began May 25, 2018, and this new development is significantly reshaping the information governance landscape for organizations worldwide that control, process or store the data of European residents. Yesterday, X1 hosted a live webinar featuring GDPR experts Jay Kramer, a partner at Lewis Brisbois in the firm’s cybersecurity and privacy group, and Marty Provin, executive vice president at Jordan Lawrence.

Kramer provided a “battlefield report” about what he is seeing from the field and hearing from his various clients, with three main observations:

  1. Many are still late to the game. Kramer noted that he has several clients contacting him well after the May 25 enforcement date to begin the process of GDPR compliance.
  1. GDPR compliance maps to best practices. Becoming GDPR ready is a good business decision because it establishes transparency, data privacy and security processes that companies should be doing anyway.
  1. Now that the law has gone into effect, organizations that have been proactive are quickly transitioning from readiness to operational compliance and enforcement. For instance, many organizations are finding themselves responding to data subject access requests.

Kramer also noted that while much focus has been on potential fines levied under GDPR, organizations need to be aware that individuals can file complaints with the supervisory authorities under article 77, or even bring their own private actions, citing article 82. These claims have already been brought in the form of class actions, and Kramer expressed concern that many more claims could be fanned by “privacy trolls” – similar in concept to “patent trolls” – or by disgruntled customers or ex-employees.

Marty Provin outlined the importance of information governance and data classification in support GDPR compliance, especially from a standpoint of the need to operationalize policies and procedures in order to identify non-compliant data throughout your organization, and properly respond to regulatory requirements and data subject access requests. Kramer seconded that point, noting that the GDPR requires that an organization have absolute knowledge of where all EU personal data is stored across the enterprise and be able to remove or minimize it when required.

This readiness is achieved through planning, data mapping, and data classification. Provin provided an informative overview of these processes, based upon his extensive experience implementing such best practices for his clients over the past 20 years. Marty observed that it is also important to have a solution like X1 Data Audit and Compliance to search and identify documents, emails and other records across your enterprise that are non-compliant with GDPR. Such a capability is essential to address both the proactive and reactive components of GDPR.

The final segment of the webinar included a live demonstration of a proactive data audit across numerous computers to find PII of EU data subjects. The second half of the demonstration illustrated an effective response to an actual data subject access request in the form of a request by an individual to have their data erased.

In addition to comprehensive search, the demo highlighted the ability of X1 to also report in a detailed fashion and then take action on identified data by migrating it or even delete in place, including within email containers.

A recording of this informative and timely webinar is available for viewing here.